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Abstract

Tolerance information is essential for manufacturing processes, because all processes will have a certain variation. It is beneficial to treat the tolerance data in a unified manner in product modelling systems. For this purpose, we took an approach to describe tolerance information of Vectorial Tolerancing (VT) in a formal way using EXPRESS developed by STEP. In VT, surface location and orientation is described with vectors in a Workpiece Coordinate System. VT provides a clear distinction between the size, form, location, and orientation deviations with magnitude and direction and is therefore useful for functional analysis and the control of manufacturing processes.

Keywords

Vectorial Tolerancing EXPRESS STEP Product Modelling 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kristian Martinsen
    • 1
  • Toshio Kojima
    • 1
  1. 1.Mechanical Engineering LaboratoryTsukuba-shi Ibaraki-ken, 305Japan

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