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Defining Sex, Gender, and Sexual Orientation

  • Sana Loue
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Abstract

It has generally been assumed that human beings must biologically be of either the male or female sex. Whether an individual is identified as a biological male or female is premised on an evaluation of chromosomal sex, gonadal sex, and morphological sex and secondary sex traits (Herdt, 1994). Lillie’s thoughts on sexual dimorphism reflect this assumption that human must be either male or female:

Keywords

Sexual Behavior Sexual Orientation Gender Role Gender Identity Sexual Identity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sana Loue
    • 1
  1. 1.Case Western Reserve UniversityClevelandOhio

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