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Defining Race, Ethnicity, and Related Constructs

  • Sana Loue
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Abstract

Science appears to have focused on the concept of race among human beings through the work of the biological taxonomist Carolus Linnaeus who, in 1735, classified human beings into four categories based upon their skin color: red, yellow, white, and black (Ehrlich and Feldman, 1977). Linnaeus further distinguished between the races based upon an amalgam of characteristics that he believed were associated with each. Whites, for instance, were said to be innovative, in contrast to blacks, who were deemed to be lazy and careless. Other scholars have credited Johann Friedrich Blumenbach, who in 1795 divided mankind into Caucasian, Mongolian, Ethiopian, American, and Malayan races, for the emergence of racial classification in western Europe and the United States (Sanjek, 1994). Regardless of who deserves such credit, from thenceforth, race would be associated with ascribed mental and moral traits.

Keywords

Ethnic Identity Related Construct Dominant Culture Shopping Cart Public Health Report 
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Authors and Affiliations

  • Sana Loue
    • 1
  1. 1.Case Western Reserve UniversityClevelandOhio

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