Abstract

Wood has been utilized by humans since antiquity. Trees provided a source of many products required by early humans such as food, medicine, fuel, and tools. For example, the bark of the willow tree, when chewed, was used as a painkiller in early Greece and was the precursor of the present-day aspirin. Wood served as the primary fuel in the United States until about the turn of the 19th century, and even today over one-half of the wood now harvested in the world is used for heating fuel.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raymond A. Young
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Forest Ecology and ManagementUniversity of WisconsinMadison

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