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Molecular Motors: Theory

  • Alex Mogilner
  • Timothy C. Elston
  • Hongyun Wang
  • George Oster
Chapter
Part of the Interdisciplinary Applied Mathematics book series (IAM, volume 20)

Abstract

Evolution has created a class of proteins that have the ability to convert chemical energy into mechanical force. Some of these use the free energy of nucleotide hydrolysis as fuel, while others employ ion gradients. Some are “walking motors,” others rotating engines. Some are reversible; others are unidirectional. Could there be any common principles among such diversity?

Keywords

Sample Path Langevin Equation Load Force Protein Motion Detailed Balance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggestions for Further Reading

  1. Elementary Applications of Probability Theory, Henry Tuckwell. A good introduction to probability theory and stochastic processes with some applications to biology (Tuckwell 1995).Google Scholar
  2. Random Walks in Biology, Howard Berg. Introductory text on applying stochastic processes to cellular and molecular biological systems. This book is written for biologists (Berg 1993).Google Scholar
  3. Handbook of Stochastic Methods, Crispin Gardiner. A good reference that covers most important topics for studying stochastic processes. However, it is not a good book for learning the subject (Gardiner 1997).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alex Mogilner
  • Timothy C. Elston
  • Hongyun Wang
  • George Oster

There are no affiliations available

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