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Sound Radiation

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Abstract

In Chapter 6, we discussed some of the basic properties of sound waves and made a brief examination of the way sound waves are influenced by simple structures, such as tubes and cavities. In the present chapter, we take up the inverse problem and look at the way in which vibrating structures can generate sound waves. This is one of the most basic aspects of the acoustics of musical instruments—it is all very well to understand the way in which a solid body vibrates, but unless that vibration leads to a radiated sound wave, we do not have a musical instrument. We might, of course, simply take the fact of sound radiation for granted, and this is often done. This neglects, however, a great deal of interesting and important physics and keeps us from understanding much of the subtlety of musical instrument behavior.

Keywords

  • Radiation Pattern
  • Acoustic Pressure
  • Musical Instrument
  • Nodal Line
  • Dipole Source

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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© 1998 Springer Science+Business Media New York

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Fletcher, N.H., Rossing, T.D. (1998). Sound Radiation. In: The Physics of Musical Instruments. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-21603-4_7

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-21603-4_7

  • Publisher Name: Springer, New York, NY

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-4419-3120-7

  • Online ISBN: 978-0-387-21603-4

  • eBook Packages: Springer Book Archive