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The Main Events in the History of Diabetes Mellitus

  • Jacek Zajac
  • Anil Shrestha
  • Parini Patel
  • Leonid Poretsky
Chapter

Abstract

A medical condition producing excessive thirst, continuous urination, and severe weight loss has interested medical authors for over three millennia. Unfortunately, until the early part of twentieth century the prognosis for a patient with this condition was no better than it was over 3000 years ago. Since the ancient physicians described almost exclusively cases of what is today known as type 1 diabetes mellitus, the outcome was invariably fatal.

Keywords

Human Insulin Insulin Lispro Diabetes Prevention Program United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study Tight Glycemic Control 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jacek Zajac
    • 1
  • Anil Shrestha
    • 2
  • Parini Patel
    • 2
  • Leonid Poretsky
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Endocrinology and MetabolismAlbert Einstein College of Medicine, Beth Israel Medical CenterNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Division of Endocrinology and MetabolismBeth Israel Medical CenterNew YorkUSA

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