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Immunology and pathology of echinostome infections in the definitive host.

  • Rafael Toledo
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter examines the salient literature on the immunology and pathology of members of the family Echinostomatidae in their definitive hosts, with emphasis on experimental studies that may provide useful information on factors that determine resistance to the parasites. For this purpose, several topics such as manifestations and mechanisms of resistance to infection, experimental strategies, and antigenic characterization of echinostomes are covered. Moreover, other topics such as immunodiagnosis are also analyzed. The analysis is focused on members of the genus Echinostoma. Although some of the nomenclature for echinostome species is disputed, the names used are those currently accepted.

Keywords

Mast Cell Host Species Goblet Cell Adult Worm Worm Burden 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Departamento de Biología Celular y ParasitologíaFacultad de Farmacia, Universidad de ValenciaBurjassot-ValenciaSpain

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