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General Strain Theory and White-Collar Crime

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Abstract

This paper applies general strain theory (GST) to the explanation of white-collar crime, including (a) occupational crimes committed by higher class individuals, (b) economic offenses such as fraud and embezzlement, which are committed by lower as well as higher class individuals, and (c) corporate crimes. Several strains or stressors are said to be especially relevant to the explanation of such crimes, including the blockage of economic goals, the experience of a range of other economic problems, the inability of achieve status goals, and a variety of work-related stressors. Whether these strains result in white-collar crime, however, is said to be influenced by such things as coping skills and resources, social support, opportunities for white-collar crime, social control, the perceived costs and benefits of white-collar crime, and association with criminal others.

Keywords

  • Class Individual
  • Corporate Crime
  • Economic Goal
  • Street Crime
  • General Strain Theory

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Agnew, R., Piquero, N.L., Cullen, F.T. (2009). General Strain Theory and White-Collar Crime. In: Simpson, S.S., Weisburd, D. (eds) The Criminology of White-Collar Crime. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-09502-8_3

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