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Towards Negotiation and the ‘Tactical Use of Armed Struggle’, 1990–7

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Abstract

As the 1980s drew to a close, the republican movement’s modus operandi had been essentially unchanged since the inauguration of the ‘long war’ over a decade earlier. While there had been some modifications to its precise workings, the ‘Armalite and the ballot box’ approach remained intact. Such modifications as there had been had sought merely to refine the IRA’s armed struggle to make it more compatible with the electoral ambitions of Sinn Féin. There had, though, been little questioning by the Adams-McGuinness leadership of the notion that the military campaign remained an indispensable part of the republican armoury.

Keywords

British Government Internal Deal Peace Process Irish Government Irish Unity 
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Notes

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Copyright information

© Martyn Frampton 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.PeterhouseUniversity of CambridgeUK

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