Brain Drain, Health and Global Justice

  • Alex Sager
Chapter

Abstract

Politicians, pundits and policy papers often suggest restrictive immigration policies as a remedy to brain drain. Among the most serious concerns is that developed states recruit badly needed health-care workers from developing states. Though I share this concern, I want to defend a paradoxical claim: the emigration of skilled workers from the developing to the developed world (brain drain) should lead us to support a more open immigration policy. The focus on brain drain in isolation obscures how migration takes place in the context of international and state-level institutions, institutions which are in some respects fundamentally unjust.

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© Alex Sager 2010

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  • Alex Sager

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