Fathering through Food: Children’s Perceptions of Fathers’ Contributions to Family Food Practices

  • Penny Curtis
  • Allison James
  • Katie Ellis
Chapter
Part of the Studies in Childhood and Youth book series

Abstract

A few years ago, the BBC hosted a national competition for amateur chefs. The 2006 Masterchef title went to a man named Peter Bayless who charted his own experience of learning to cook in a book entitled My Father Could Only Boil Cornflakes — a sardonic title which serves to reaffirm Morgan’s observation that the ‘alleged incompetence of men in the kitchen is frequently the subject of considerable humour and right comment’ (1996:159). My Father Could Only Boil Cornflakes both emphasises Bayless’s expertise and implies incompetence in other men, particularly those of a different generation.

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Copyright information

© Penny Curtis, Allison James, Katie Ellis 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Penny Curtis
  • Allison James
  • Katie Ellis

There are no affiliations available

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