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From Plantations to Prisons: African American Women Prisoners in the United States

  • Ellen M. Barry
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Part of the Black Religion/Womanist Thought/Social Justice book series

Abstract

Although the United States was founded on principles of liberty and justice, in practice this country has a long and unfortunate history of denying justice to subgroups in its population, particularly on the basis of race. From the initial forays of Europeans into what they saw as a new continent and the resultant decimation of Native tribes, to the adoption and spread of the slavery system and its devastation of African families and communities, to contemporary attacks on undocumented immigrants, this country has denied justice to marginalized populations within its borders.1 Today, research documents the impact of racial discrimination at every level of the criminal justice system, from arrest through sentencing and incarceration.2

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Copyright information

© Bernadette J. Brooten 2010

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  • Ellen M. Barry

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