Beyond Slavery pp 309-318 | Cite as

Epilogue

  • Mende Nazer
  • Bernadette J. Brooten
Chapter
Part of the Black Religion/Womanist Thought/Social Justice book series

Abstract

Mende Nazer, internationally known anti-slavery activist, was enslaved for six years in the Sudan as a young girl and later escaped in London, after having been sent there by her Khartoum owner to the owner’s sister. Slave: My True Story, which Nazer co-wrote with journalist Damien Lewis, opened the world’s eyes to slavery in the Sudan.1 Before speaking out about her ordeal, Nazer had to weigh potential reprisals by the repressive Sudanese government against her relatives still living there versus the fate of the countless enslaved persons to whom her book might draw attention. Fortunately, the intense international media attention to the book has thus far protected Nazer’s family.

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Notes

  1. 1.
    Mende Nazer and Damien Lewis, Slave: My True Story (New York: Public Affairs, 2003)Google Scholar
  2. Mende Nazer, Damien Lewis, and Karin Dufner, Befreit: Die Heimkehr der Sklavin (Munich: Droemer, 2007).Google Scholar
  3. 10.
    Abdullah Yusuf Ali, trans., The Qur’an Translation, 3rd U.S. ed. (Elmhurst, NY: Tahrike Tarsile Qur’an, 1998). For this and two additional translations of these verses, see University of Southern California, Center for Muslim-Jewish Engagement, under “Translations of the Qur’an, Surah 23,” http://www.usc.edu/schools/college/crcc/engagement/resources/texts/muslim/quran/023.qmt.html (accessed July 17, 2009).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Bernadette J. Brooten 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mende Nazer
  • Bernadette J. Brooten

There are no affiliations available

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