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Materials Used as Tissue Phantoms in Medical Simulation

Part of the Studies in Mechanobiology, Tissue Engineering and Biomaterials book series

Abstract

Medical simulation is a technique used to train students and professional healthcare providers to perform a variety of clinical procedures without placing patients at risk. While medical simulation has been shown to reduce medical errors and associated costs, there exists a need for more realistic tissue analogue materials that account for tissue biomechanical responses in various situations. This chapter provides an overview of materials used in medical simulation by discussing concepts used in the mechanical characterization of materials, the complex structure and mechanical properties of biological tissues, the chemical structure and mechanical properties of materials commonly used in medical simulators, the designs of medical simulation devices on the market today and those reported in literature, and the recent developments and future directions in this field.

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Acknowledgments

The authors would like to acknowledge John Kromer of the Miami University Libraries for his assistance with conducting the initial literature review.

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Bootsma, K., Dimbath, E., Berberich, J., Sparks, J.L. (2016). Materials Used as Tissue Phantoms in Medical Simulation. In: Studies in Mechanobiology, Tissue Engineering and Biomaterials. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/8415_2016_1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/8415_2016_1

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