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Body Composition, Anthropometric Indices and Hydration Status of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients: Can Cachexia Coexist with Obesity?

  • Barbara Kuźnar-Kamińska
  • Marcin Grabicki
  • Tomasz Trafas
  • Monika Szulińska
  • Szczepan Cofta
  • Tomasz Piorunek
  • Beata Brajer-Luftmann
  • Agata Nowicka
  • Barbara Bromińska
  • Halina Batura-Gabryel
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 1020)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to elucidate body composition, anthropometric indices, and hydration status in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients, taking into account different disease stages, gender, and the possibility of the presence of cachexia. There were 98 OSA patients and 23 control subjects enrolled into the study. All study participants underwent polysomnography examination. Body mass index (BMI), fat mass index (FMI), fat free mass, muscle mass, body cell mass, total body water, and extracellular and intracellular water were evaluated. The neck, abdominal, and waist circumference was measured. We found that overweight and obesity were present in 96% of patients. Cachexia was present in one OSA individual with comorbidities. Apnea-hypopnea index correlated with the neck and waist circumference, and with BMI in OSA patients. All muscle indices and water contents above outlined were significantly higher in severe OSA compared with control subjects. BMI, FMI, neck circumference, and extracellular water were greater in a subset of severe OSA compared with a moderate OSA stage. The female OSA patients had a higher FMI than that present in males at a comparable BMI. We conclude that the most body composition indices differed significantly between severe OSA patients and control subjects. A higher FMI in females at a comparable BMI could be due to a discordance between BMI and FMI. Cachexia occurs rarely in OSA and seems to coexist with comorbidities.

Keywords

Apnea-hypopnea index Body composition Body water content Cachexia Hydration Nutritional status Obesity Obstructive sleep apnea 

Notes

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest in relation to this article.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barbara Kuźnar-Kamińska
    • 1
  • Marcin Grabicki
    • 1
  • Tomasz Trafas
    • 1
  • Monika Szulińska
    • 2
  • Szczepan Cofta
    • 1
  • Tomasz Piorunek
    • 1
  • Beata Brajer-Luftmann
    • 1
  • Agata Nowicka
    • 1
  • Barbara Bromińska
    • 3
  • Halina Batura-Gabryel
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pulmonology, Allergology and Respiratory OncologyPoznan University of Medical SciencesPoznanPoland
  2. 2.Department of Internal Diseases, Metabolic Disorders and HypertensionPoznan University of Medical SciencesPoznanPoland
  3. 3.Department of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Internal MedicinePoznan University of Medical SciencesPoznanPoland

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