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Development of Spoken Language User Interfaces: A Tool Kit Approach

  • Hassan Alam
  • Ahmad Fuad Rezaur Rahman
  • Timotius Tjahjadi
  • Hua Cheng
  • Paul Llido
  • Aman Kumar
  • Rachmat Hartono
  • Yulia Tarnikova
  • Che Wilcox
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 2396)

Abstract

This paper introduces a toolkit that allows programmers with no linguistic knowledge to rapidly develop a Spoken Language User Interface (SLUI) for various applications. The applications may vary from web-based e-commerce to the control of domestic appliances. Using the SLUI Toolkit, a programmer is able to create a system that incorporates Natural Language Processing (NLP), complex syntactic parsing, and semantic understanding. The system has been tested using ten human evaluators in a specific domain of a web based e-commerce application. The evaluators have overwhelmingly endorsed the ease of use and applicability of the tool kit in rapid development of speech and natural language processing interfaces for this domain.

Keywords

Natural Language Processing Automatic Speech Recognition Automatic Speech Recognition System Input Sentence Sample Sentence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hassan Alam
    • 1
  • Ahmad Fuad Rezaur Rahman
    • 1
  • Timotius Tjahjadi
    • 1
  • Hua Cheng
    • 1
  • Paul Llido
    • 1
  • Aman Kumar
    • 1
  • Rachmat Hartono
    • 1
  • Yulia Tarnikova
    • 1
  • Che Wilcox
    • 1
  1. 1.Human Computer Interaction GroupBCL Technologies Inc.Santa ClaraUSA

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