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A knowledge-based system for workflow management using the world wide web

  • John Debenham
Knowledge-Based Systems
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1342)

Abstract

A knowledge-based system acts as an intelligent agent to manage workflows. This knowledge-based system represents both organisational rules and cultural factors, as well as the state of the decision making environment. An experimental intelligent workflow system has been built to manage the processing of applications received by a university department from potential research students. This particular workflow was selected because it involves a range of different types of interaction with the players that interact with the system. This experimental system uses no physical documents. Interactive documents are available on the world wide web; `read only' documents are sent by electronic mail. Principles for designing intelligent workflow systems have emerged from this experiment. As a result of this experiment a second version of this intelligent workflow system is being constructed in a distributed environment. Intelligent workflow systems admit considerable flexibility in the formation of decision making bodies. The exploitation of innovative forms of decision making bodies can form the basis of efficient decision making environments that can not be realised in traditional systems.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Debenham
    • 1
  1. 1.Key Centre for Advanced Computing SciencesUniversity of TechnologySydneyAustralia

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