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From data to knowledge: method-specific transformations

  • Michael J. Donahoo
  • J. William Murdock
  • Ashok K. Goel
  • Shamkant Navathe
  • Edward Omiecinski
Communications Session 5B Intelligent Information Systems
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1325)

Abstract

Generality and scale are important but difficult issues in knowledge engineering. At the root of the difficulty lie two hard questions: how to accumulate huge volumes of knowledge, and how to support heterogeneous knowledge and processing? One answer to the first question is to reuse legacy knowledge systems, integrate knowledge systems with legacy databases, and enable sharing of the databases by multiple knowledge systems. We present an architecture called HIPED for realizing this answer. HIPED converts the second question above into a new form: how to convert data accessed from a legacy database into a form appropriate to the processing method used in a legacy knowledge system? One answer to this reformed question is to use method-specific transformation of data into knowledge. We describe an experiment in which a legacy knowledge system called Interactive Kritik is integrated with an ORACLE database using IDI as the communication tool. The experiment indicates the computational feasibility of method-specific data-to-knowledge transformations.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael J. Donahoo
    • 1
  • J. William Murdock
    • 1
  • Ashok K. Goel
    • 1
  • Shamkant Navathe
    • 1
  • Edward Omiecinski
    • 1
  1. 1.Georgia Institute of TechnologyCollege of ComputingAtlantaUSA

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