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Expressing code mobility in mobile UNITY

  • Gian Pietro Picco
  • Gruia-Catalin Roman
  • Peter J. McCann
Regular Sessions Decomposition and Distribution
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1301)

Abstract

Advancements in network technology have led to the emergence of new computing paradigms that challenge established programming practices by employing weak forms of consistency and dynamic forms of binding. Code mobility, for instance, allows for invocation-time binding between a code fragment and the location where it executes. Similarly, mobile computing allows hosts (and the software they execute) to alter their physical location. Despite apparent similarities, the two paradigms are distinct in their treatment of location and movement. This paper seeks to uncover a common foundation for the two paradigms by exploring the manner in which stereotypical forms of code mobility can be expressed in a programming notation developed for mobile computing. Several solutions to a distributed simulation problem are used to illustrate the modeling strategy for programs that employ code mobility.

Keywords

Code mobility UNITY Mobile UNITY coordination mobile computing mobile code languages 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gian Pietro Picco
    • 1
    • 2
  • Gruia-Catalin Roman
    • 2
  • Peter J. McCann
    • 2
  1. 1.Dipartimento di Automatica e InformaticaPolitecnico di TorinoTorinoItaly
  2. 2.Department of Computer ScienceWashington UniversitySaint LouisUSA

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