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Offset-polygon annulus placement problems

  • Gill Barequet
  • Amy J. Briggs
  • Matthew T. Dickerson
  • Michael T. Goodrich
Session 11A: Invited Lecture
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1272)

Abstract

In this paper we address several variants of the polygon annulus placement problem: given an input polygon P and a set S of points, find an optimal placement of P that maximizes the number of points in S that fall in a certain annulus region defined by P and some offset distance δ > 0. We address the following variants of the problem: placement of a convex polygon as well as a simple polygon; placement by translation only, or by a translation and a rotation; off-line and on-line versions of the corresponding decision problems; and decision as well as optimization versions of the problems: We present efFicient algorithms in each case.

Keywords

optimal polygon placement tolerancing robot localization offsetting 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gill Barequet
    • 1
  • Amy J. Briggs
    • 2
  • Matthew T. Dickerson
    • 2
  • Michael T. Goodrich
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Geometric Computing, Dept. of Computer ScienceJohns Hopkins UniversityBaltimore
  2. 2.Department of Mathematics and Computer ScienceMiddlebury CollegeMiddlebury

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