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The evaluation of a hierarchical case representation using context guided retrieval

  • Ian Watson
  • Srinath Perera
Scientific Papers Representation And Formalization
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1266)

Abstract

This paper presents the results of the comparison of the performance of a hierarchical case representation using a context guided retrieval method against that of a simpler flat file representation using standard nearest neighbour retrieval. The estimation of the construction costs of light industrial warehouse buildings is used as the test domain. Each case comprises approximately 400 features. These are structured into a hierarchical case representation that holds more general contextual features at its top and specific building elements at its leaves. A modified nearest neighbour retrieval algorithm is used that is guided by contextual similarity. Problems are decomposed into sub-problems and solutions recomposed into a final solution. The comparative results show that the context guided retrieval method using the hierarchical case representation out performs the simple flat file representation and standard nearest neighbour retrieval.

Keywords

Context Guided Retrieval Hierarchical Case-Representation 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ian Watson
    • 1
  • Srinath Perera
    • 2
  1. 1.AI-CBR, Bridgewater BuildingUniversity of SalfordSalfordUK
  2. 2.Department of Building EconomicsUniversity of MoratuaMoratuaSri Lanka

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