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A database perspective to a cooperation environment

  • S. M. Deen
Invited Papers
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1202)

Abstract

This paper will present the author's view of a Cooperating Knowledge Based System (CKBS) as an applied multi-agent system with a database perspective, based on well-defined computer-science concepts, rather than AI concepts. Each agent will be seen as an autonomous (necessarily large-grain) system which implicitly cooperates with other agents to achieve a global goal in a potentially multi-user environment, where performance, reliability, concurrent usage, user-friendliness are particularly important.

In this model, each agent is capable of executing well-defined actions of one or possibly more skill types in a multi-layered architecture where inter-agent communications are carried out in a medium of what are called shadows, with distribution transparency. The architecture also supports user-defined cooperation strategies to be followed by the cooperating agents for specific tasks. The model provides a useful basis for real-world applications of a number of domains, such as agent-based manufacturing, distributed network traffic flow and distributed service ontology.

Keywords

Multi-agent Systems Cooperating Knowledge Based Systems Cooperating Agents Cooperation Architecture 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. M. Deen
    • 1
  1. 1.DAKE Centre (Department of Computer Science)University of KeeleKeeleEngland

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