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Implementation of hidden concurrency in CORBA clients

  • Patrick Hellemans
  • Frank Steegmans
  • Hans Vanderstraeten
  • Han Zuidweg
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1161)

Abstract

This paper reports on the introduction of concurrency at the client side, as an engineering solution to improve performance. It is shown that, by combining a wait-by-necessity principle, where the calling process only blocks when a return value of a function call is needed, with the handle concept, used to control the access to an object, hidden concurrency can be introduced into CORBA-based client components. Concurrency is achieved by splitting sequential calls to servers through the creation of dedicated threads. Hidden signifies the fact that the split is hidden for the client code by including the thread creation in the serverStub, while the synchronisation needed at some point in the client process is done through the handle mechanism combined with the wait-by-necessity principle. The introduction of this kind of concurrency can be done transparently from the client and server application code. The principle of hidden concurrency through the introduction of multiple threads at the calling side has been contrasted with the single thread scenario through an example, which takes on the TINA (Telecommunication Information Networking Architecture) Connection Management Architecture as a particular case study.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patrick Hellemans
    • 1
  • Frank Steegmans
    • 1
  • Hans Vanderstraeten
    • 1
  • Han Zuidweg
    • 1
  1. 1.Alcatel TelecomAntwerpBelgium

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