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Scheduling, timetabling and rostering — A special relationship?

  • Anthony Wren
Surveys
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1153)

Abstract

Computer solution of timetabling, scheduling and rostering problems has been addressed in the literature since the 1950's. Early mathematical formulations proved impossible to solve given the limited computer power of the era. However, heuristics, often very specialised, were used for certain problems from a very early date, although the term heuristic was not generally recognised until later; a few guaranteed optimality, some consistently produced good solutions, but most became unwieldy when adjusted to deal with practical situations. In some cases, weaknesses in the heuristics were overcome by appeal to manual intervention. Mathematical approaches to some problems returned to favour, successfully, around 1980. Some of the subsequent developments of these are very powerful in practical situations, but they are no panacea, and metaheuristics are the flavour of the nineties.

This paper explores the relationships between the problem types, and traces the above developments as applied principally in the areas of Vehicle Routeing and Scheduling, Driver Scheduling, Job Shop Scheduling and Personnel Rostering. Parallels are drawn with Class and Examination Timetabling, but these subjects themselves are not examined, as they are covered extensively elsewhere in this volume.

Keywords

Schedule Problem Simulated Annealing Tabu Search Travel Salesman Problem Travel Salesman Problem 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anthony Wren
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Computer StudiesUniversity of LeedsLeeds

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