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Putting default logics in perspective

  • Thomas Linke
  • Torsten Schaub
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1137)

Abstract

The evolution of Reiter's default logic has resulted in diverse variants sharing many interesting properties. This process however seems to be diverging because it has led to default logics that are difficult to compare due to different formal characterizations dealing sometimes even with different objects of discourse. This problem is addressed in this paper. That is, we elaborate on the relationships between different types of default logics. In particular, we show how two recently proposed variants, namely rational and CA-default logic, are related to each other and existing default logics.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas Linke
    • 1
  • Torsten Schaub
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Mathematics and Computer ScienceUniversity of BremenBremen
  2. 2.Faculté de SciencesUniversité d'AngersAngers Cedex 01

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