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Teacher-usable exercise design tools

  • Michael Schoelles
  • Henry Hamburger
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1086)

Abstract

We present software tools with which a language teacher can specify exercises for the Fluent-2 two-medium conversational language learning environment. The tools permit creation of tutorial schemas, language usage structures and graphical properties of objects. These data structures play major roles in guiding the execution of an exercise on a particular grammatical topic. The tools support our goal of immersing the learner in realistic situations with varied language constructions and conversational styles. They give a teacher some control over the situation, style and variety and let her construct exercises for particular grammatical topics.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Schoelles
    • 1
  • Henry Hamburger
    • 1
  1. 1.George Mason UniversityFairfaxUSA

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