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Integrated agent architecture: Execution and recognition of mental-states

  • Anand S. Rao
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1087)

Abstract

Recognizing the mental-state — the beliefs, desires, plans, and intentions — of other agents situated in the environment is an important part of intelligent activity. Doing this with limited resources and in a continuously changing environment, where agents are also changing their own mental-state, is a challenging task. Following the relative success of reactive planning, as opposed to classical planning, we introduce the notion of reactive plan recognition. We integrate reactive planning and reactive plan recognition and embed them within the framework of an agent's mental-state. This results in a powerful architecture for agents that can handle executions based on mental-states and recognition of the mental-states of other agents.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anand S. Rao
    • 1
  1. 1.Australian Artificial Intelligence InstituteMelbourneAustralia

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