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Motivation and perception mechanisms in mobile agents for electronic commerce

  • C. Munday
  • J. Dangedej
  • T. Cross
  • D. Lukose
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1087)

Abstract

In this paper, the authors describe a mobile agency and an extendable mobile agent architecture that are specifically designed for Electronic Commerce. These agents are composed using two categories of mechanism: Reflexive Mechanism; and Deliberative Mechanism. Reflexive Mechanisms run concurrently in the agent, and the agent has no way of consciously controlling or directing its functions. On the other hand, the functions of Deliberative Mechanisms are consciously directed by the agent. This paper describes two Reflexive Mechanisms used in building deliberate agents: perception; and motivation mechanisms. We explore the types of knowledge and information stored in the Long-term and Short-term memory of the agent, how this knowledge and information are used by these mechanisms to perceive the external world, how the motives of the agent are revised, and finally, how motivations are generated.

Keywords

Motivation Perception Mobile Agent Electronic Commerce Conceptual Graphs Executable Conceptual Structures KQML KIF 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Munday
    • 1
  • J. Dangedej
    • 1
  • T. Cross
    • 1
  • D. Lukose
    • 1
  1. 1.Distributed Artificial Intelligence Centre (DAIC) Department of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computing ScienceThe University of New EnglandArmidaleAustralia

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