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Formalization of reasoning about default action (preliminary report)

Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1085)

Abstract

In this paper we consider domains of actions involving causal chains of actions and default actions. In order to represent these domains, we define a language (ie540-01) that extends the language (ie540-02) introduced by Gelfond and Lifschitz. We provide a translation from (ie540-03) into circumscriptive theories and show that this translation is sound and complete relative to the semantics of (ie540-04). Our approach is related to Sandewall's PMON logic and the occlusion concept. The analysis assumes a discrete linear model of time.

Keywords

Causal Chain Action Language Concurrent Action Causal Action Domain Description 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of MathematicsWarsaw University of TechnologyWarsawPoland

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