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A chart generator for Shake and Bake machine translation

  • Fred Popowich
Natural Language I: Generation
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1081)

Abstract

A generation algorithm based on an active chart parsing algorithm is introduced which can be used in conjunction with a Shake and Bake machine translation system. A concise Prolog implementation of the algorithm is provided, and some performance comparisons with a shift-reduce based algorithm are given which show the chart generator is much more efficient for generating all possible sentences from an input specification.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fred Popowich
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Computing ScienceSimon Fraser University BurnabyBritish ColumbiaCanada

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