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How to win a dashed line detection contest

  • Dov Dori
  • Liu Wenyin
  • Mor Peleg
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1072)

Abstract

Correct recognition of dashed lines is essential for high-level technical drawing understanding. Automatic solution is quite difficult due to the limitations of machine vision algorithm. In order to promote development of better techniques, a dashed line detection contest was held at the Pennsylvania State University during the First International Workshop on Graphics Recognition, August 9–11, 1995. The contest required automatic detection of dashed lines on test drawings at three difficulty levels: simple, medium and complex, which contained dashed and dash-dotted lines in straight and curved shapes, and even interwoven texts. This paper presents dashed line detection techniques which won the first place in the contest. It successfully detected the dashed lines in all drawings. The underlying mechanism is a sequential stepwise recovery of components that meet certain continuity conditions. Results of experiments are presented and discussed.

Keywords

Dashed Line Graphics Recognition Technical Drawings 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dov Dori
    • 1
  • Liu Wenyin
    • 1
  • Mor Peleg
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Industrial Engineering and ManagementTechnion-Israel Institute of TechnologyHaifaIsrael

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