Skip to main content

Naive Geography

Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS,volume 988)

Abstract

This paper defines the notion and concepts of Naive Geography, the field of study that is concerned with formal models of the common-sense geographic world. Naive Geography is the body of knowledge that people have about the surrounding geographic world. Naive Geography is envisioned to comprise a set of theories that provide the basis for designing future Geographic Information Systems that follow human intuition and are, therefore, easily accessible to a large range of users.

Keywords

  • Geographic Space
  • Geographic Information System
  • Fuzzy Reasoning
  • North Atlantic Treaty Organization
  • Qualitative Reasoning

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

This work was partially supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) for National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis (NCGIA) under grant number SBE-8810917. Max Egenhofer's work is further supported by NSF grant IRI-9309230, and grants from Intergraph Corporation, Space Imaging Inc., Environmental Systems Research Institute, and the Scientific and Environmental Affairs Division of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/3-540-60392-1_1
  • Chapter length: 15 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   109.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-3-540-45519-6
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book
USD   149.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  • Abler, R., J. Adams, and P. Gould (1971) Spatial Organization—The Geographer's View of the World. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bunge, W. (1962) Theoretical Geography. Lund: C.W.K. Gleerup.

    Google Scholar 

  • Buttenfield, B. (1989) Multiple Representations: Initiative 3 Specialist Meeting Report. National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis, Santa Barbara, CA, Technical Report 89-3.

    Google Scholar 

  • Buyong, T., W. Kuhn, and A. Frank (1991) A Conceptual Model of Measurement-Based Multipurpose Cadastral Systems, URISA Journal 3(2):35–49.

    Google Scholar 

  • Couclelis, H. and N. Gale (1986) Space and Spaces. Geografiska Annaler 68(B):1–12.

    Google Scholar 

  • De Kleer, J. (1992) Physics, Qualitative, in: S. Shapiro (ed.), Encyclopedia of Artificial Intelligence. Second Edition. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2:1149–1159.

    Google Scholar 

  • De Kleer, J. and J. Brown (1984) A Qualitative Physics Based on Confluences. Artificial Intelligence 24:7–83.

    Google Scholar 

  • Downs, R. and D. Stea (1977) Maps in Minds: Reflections on Cognitive Mapping. New York: Harper and Row.

    Google Scholar 

  • Egenhofer, M. and R. Franzosa (1991) Point-Set Spatial Topological Relations. International Journal of Geographical Information Systems 5(2): 161–174.

    Google Scholar 

  • Egenhofer, M. and R. Golledge (1994) Time in Geographic Space: Report on the Specialist Meeting of Research Initiative 10. National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis, Santa Barbara, CA, Technical Report 94-9.

    Google Scholar 

  • Egenhofer, M. and J. Herring (1991) High-Level Spatial Data Structures for GIS. in: D. Maguire, M. Goodchild, and D. Rhind (eds.), Geographical Information Systems, Vol. 1: Principles. London: Longman, pp. 147–163.

    Google Scholar 

  • Forbus, K., P. Nielsen, and B. Faltings (1991) Qualitative Spatial Reasoning: The Clock Project. Artificial Intelligence 51:417–471.

    Google Scholar 

  • Frank, A. (1987) Towards a Spatial Theory, in: International Geographic Information Systems (IGIS) Symposium: The Research Agenda. Arlington, VA, pp. 215–227.

    Google Scholar 

  • Frank, A. (1992) Personal communication.

    Google Scholar 

  • Frank, A. and I. Campari, Eds. (1993) Spatial Information Theory, European Conference, COSIT '93. Lecture Notes in Computer Science Vol. 716. New York: Springer-Verlag.

    Google Scholar 

  • Frank, A. and D. Mark (1991) Language Issues for GIS. in: D. Maguire, M. Goodchild, and D. Rhind (eds.), Geographical Information Systems, Vol. 1: Principles. London: Longman, pp. 147–163.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gelsey, A. and D. McDermott (1990) Spatial Reasoning About Mechanisms. in: S. Chen (Ed.), Advances in Spatial Reasoning. 1:1–33, Norwood, NJ: Ablex Publishing Corporation.

    Google Scholar 

  • Golledge, R. (1978) Learning about Urban Environments. in: T. Carlstein, D. Parkes, and N. Thrift (Eds.), Timing Space and Spacing Time. London: Edward Arnold.

    Google Scholar 

  • Golledge, R., R. Briggs, and D. Demko (1969) The Configuration of Distances in Intra-Urban Space. Proceedings of the Association of American Geographers, pp. 60–65.

    Google Scholar 

  • Goodchild, M. (1992) Geographical Information Science. International Journal of Geographical Information Systems 6(1):31–45.

    Google Scholar 

  • Goodchild, M. (1994) Personal communication.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hardt, S. (1992). Physics, Naive. in: S. Shapiro (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Artificial Intelligence. Second Edition. New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2:1147–1149.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hayes, P. (1978) The Naive Physics Manifesto. in: D. Michie (Ed.), Expert Systems in the Microelectronic Age. Edinburgh, Scotland: Edinburgh University Press, pp. 242–270.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hayes, P. (1985a) The Second Naive Physics Manifesto. in: J. Hobbs and R. Moore (Eds.), Formal Theories of the Commonsense World. Norwood, NJ: Ablex, pp. 1–36.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hayes, P. (1985b) Naive Physics I: Ontology of Liquids. in: J. Hobbs and R. Moore (Eds.), Formal Theories of the Commonsense World. Norwood, NJ: Ablex, pp. 71–108.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hernández, D. (1994) Qualitative Representation of Spatial Knowledge, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 804, New York: Springer-Verlag.

    Google Scholar 

  • Herskovits, A. (1986) Language and Spatial Cognition—An Interdisciplinary Study of the Prepositions in English. Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hirtle, S. and J. Jonides (1985) Evidence of Hierarchies in Cognitive Maps. Memory and Cognition 13(3):208–217.

    Google Scholar 

  • Jones, S. (1963) Weights and Measures: An Informal Guide. Washington, D.C.: Public Affairs Press

    Google Scholar 

  • Kennelly, A. (1928) Vestiges of Pre-Metric Weights and Measures Persisting in Metric-System Europe, 1926–1927. New York: The Macmillan Company.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kosslyn, S., T. Ball, and B. Reiser (1978) Visual Images Preserve Metric Spatial Information: Evidence from Studies of Image Scanning. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance 4:47–60

    Google Scholar 

  • Kuipers, B. (1978) Modeling Spatial Knowledge. Cognitive Science 2:129–153.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kuipers, B. and T. Levitt (1988) Navigation and Mapping in Large-Scale Space. AI Magazine 9(2):25–46.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kula, W. (1983) Les Mesures et Les Hommes. Paris: Maison des Sciences de L'Homme. [Translated from Polish by Joanna Ritt; Polish edition 1970.]

    Google Scholar 

  • Lynch, K. (1960) The Image of a City. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Mark, D. (1992a) Spatial Metaphors for Human-Computer Interaction. Fifth International Symposium on Spatial Data Handling. Charleston, SC, 1:104–112.

    Google Scholar 

  • Mark, D. (1992b) Counter-Intuitive Geographic “Facts”: Clues for Spatial Reasoning at Geographic Scales. in: A. Frank, I. Campari, and U. Formentini (Eds.), Theories and Methods of Spatio-Temporal Reasoning in Geographic Space. Lecture Notes in Computer Science No. 639, Berlin: Springer-Verlag, pp. 305–317.

    Google Scholar 

  • Mark, D., D. Comas, M. Egenhofer, S. Freundschuh, M. Gould, and J. Nunes (1995) Evaluating and Refining Computational Models of Spatial Relations Through Cross-Linguistic Human-Subjects Testing, COSIT '95, Semmering, Austria, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Springer-Verlag.

    Google Scholar 

  • Mark, D. and S. Freundschuh (1995) Spatial Concepts and Cognitive Models for Geographic Information Use. in: T. Nyerges, D. Mark, R. Laurini, and M. Egenhofer (Eds.), Cognitive Aspects of Human-Computer Interaction for Geographic Information Systems. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

    Google Scholar 

  • Marr, D. (1982) Vision, San Francisco, CA: W.H. Freeman.

    Google Scholar 

  • McClosky, M. (1983) Intuitive Physics. Scientific American 248(4): 122–130.

    Google Scholar 

  • McNamara, T., J. Hardy, and S. Hirtle (1989) Subjective Hierarchies in Spatial Memory, Journal of Environmental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition 15(2):211–227.

    Google Scholar 

  • Montello, D. (1993) Scale and Multiple Psychologies of Space. in: A. Frank and I. Campari (Eds.), Spatial Information Theory: A Theoretical Basis for GIS. Lecture Notes in Computer Sciences No. 716, Berlin: Springer-Verlag, pp. 312–321.

    Google Scholar 

  • Morrissey, J. (1990) Imprecise Information and Uncertainty in Information Systems. ACM Transactions of Information Systems 8(2): 159–180.

    Google Scholar 

  • Papadias, D. (1995) Personal communication.

    Google Scholar 

  • Papadias, D. and T. Sellis (1994) Qualitative Representation of Spatial Knowledge in Two-Dimensional Space. VLDB Journal 3(4):479–516.

    Google Scholar 

  • Pederson, E. (1993) Geographic and Manipulable Space in Two Tamil Linguistic Systems. in: A. Frank and I. Campari (Eds.), Spatial Information Theory: A Theoretical Basis for GIS. Lecture Notes in Computer Sciences No. 716, Berlin: Springer-Verlag.

    Google Scholar 

  • Piaget, J. and B. Inhelder (1967) The Child's Conception of Space. New York: Norton.

    Google Scholar 

  • Retz-Schmidt, G. (1988) Various Views on Spatial Prepositions. AI Magazine 9:95–105.

    Google Scholar 

  • Riesbeck, C. (1980) You Can't Miss It: Judging the Clarity of Directions. Cognitive Science 4:285–303.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sharma, J., D. Flewelling, and M. Egenhofer (1994) A Qualitative Spatial Reasoner. in: T. Waugh and R. Healey (Eds.) Sixth International Symposium on Spatial Data Handling. Edinburgh, Scotland, pp. 665–681.

    Google Scholar 

  • Smith, B. (1994) The Formal Ontology of Space: An Essay in Mereotopology. in: L. Hahn (Ed.), The Philosophy of Roderick Chisholm. Chicago and LaSalle: Open Court (in press).

    Google Scholar 

  • Stevens, A. and P. Coupe (1978) Distortions in Judged Spatial Relations. Cognitive Psychology 10:422–437.

    Google Scholar 

  • Talmy, L. (1983) How Language Structures Space. in: H. Pick and L. Acredolo (Eds.), Spatial Orientation: Theory, Research, and Application. New York: Plenum Press, pp. 225–282.

    Google Scholar 

  • Tversky, B. (1981) Distortions in Memory for Maps. Cognitive Psychology 13:407–433.

    Google Scholar 

  • Waddington, M. (1993) Naive Geography. Queen's Quarterly 100(1):149.

    Google Scholar 

  • Zadeh, L. (1974) Fuzzy Logic and Its Application to Approximate Reasoning. in: Information Processing. North-Holland Publishing Company.

    Google Scholar 

  • Zubin, D. (1989) Untitled, in: D. Mark, A. Frank, M. Egenhofer, S. Freundschuh, M. McGranaghan, and R. M. White (Eds.), Languages of Spatial Relations: Initiative Two Specialist Meeting Report. Technical Paper 89-2, National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis, Santa Barbara, CA, pp. 13–17.

    Google Scholar 

  • Zupko, R. (1968) A Dictionary of English Weights and Measures. Madison, WI: The University of Wisconsin Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Zupko, R. (1977) British Weights and Measures: A History from Antiquity to the Seventeenth Century. Madison, WI: The University of Wisconsin Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Zupko, R. (1978) French Weights and Measures Before the Revolution: A Dictionary of Provincial and Local Units. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 1995 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

About this paper

Cite this paper

Egenhofer, M.J., Mark, D.M. (1995). Naive Geography. In: Frank, A.U., Kuhn, W. (eds) Spatial Information Theory A Theoretical Basis for GIS. COSIT 1995. Lecture Notes in Computer Science, vol 988. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-60392-1_1

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/3-540-60392-1_1

  • Published:

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-540-60392-4

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-540-45519-6

  • eBook Packages: Springer Book Archive