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A reduction of the theory of confirmation to the notions of distance and measure

  • Karl Schlechta
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 946)

Abstract

We present an analysis and formalization of confirmation of a theory through observation. The basic ideas are, first, to carry the results of single observations over to neighbouring cases by analogy, using an abstract distance relation as in the Stalnaker/Lewis semantics for counterfactual conditionals. A theory is then, in a second step, considered confirmed iff we have thus concluded positively for a “large” part of the universe — where “large” is interpreted by a weak filter. Formal semantics as well as sound and complete axiomatizations for the (trivial) first order and the propositional case are given.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karl Schlechta
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire d'Informatique de Marseille, URA CNRS 1787CMI, Technopôle de Château-GombertMarseille Cedex 13France

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