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Functional evaluation of SETH: An expert system in clinical toxicology

  • Stéfan J. Darmoni
  • Philippe Massari
  • Jean-Michel Droy
  • Thierry Blanc
  • Jacques Leroy
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 934)

Abstract

The aim of SETH is to give end-users specific advice concerning treatment and monitoring of drug poisoning. It is developed with an off the shelf expert system shell and runs on a microcomputer. The SETH expert system simulates the expert reasoning, taking into account for each toxicological class delay, signs and dose. The implementation of Seth began in April 1992 in our Poison Control Centre (PCC). SETH is then daily used by residents as telephone response support on drug poisoning. Between April 1992 and October 1994, 2099 cases inputted by residents were analysed by SETH. In October 1994, a functional evaluation of SETH showed that its effect in the daily practise of our PCC is positive: the performance of the residents increased and they would agree to use it outside our University Hospital. An expert system in clinical toxicology is a valuable tool in the daily practise of a Poison Control Centre.

Key-words

Evaluation Expert system decision making, computer-assisted drugs poisoning adult child 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stéfan J. Darmoni
    • 1
  • Philippe Massari
    • 2
  • Jean-Michel Droy
    • 3
  • Thierry Blanc
    • 4
  • Jacques Leroy
    • 3
  1. 1.Information System and Informatics DepartmentRouen University HospitalRouen CedexFrance
  2. 2.Medical Informatics UnitRouen University HospitalFrance
  3. 3.Poison Control Centre and Adult Intensive Care UnitRouen University HospitalFrance
  4. 4.Child Intensive Care UnitRouen University HospitalFrance

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