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Investigations into the application of deontic logic

  • Nienke den Haan
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 897)

Abstract

This paper discusses the results of a study for representation of law. Starting point is a legal knowledge based system for the Dutch traffic law that treats permissions as specialized obligations. The results of this prototype system have been evaluated and were the subject for further study. The second half of this paper looks into computationally attractive formalisms that capture deontic modalities more naturally.

Keywords

Actual World Legal Rule Legal Reasoning Deontic Logic Legal Knowledge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nienke den Haan

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