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Industry involvement in undergraduate curricula: Reinforcing learning by applying the principles

  • Geoffrey N Dick
  • Stuart F Jones
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 895)

Abstract

This paper describes industry participation in education through its involvement in the Business Information Technology programme at the University of New South Wales. Although primarily aimed at providing details of the practices followed and the experiences gained, the paper commences with a comprehensive review of the literature on IS education, particularly co-operative education. Industry is involved in all aspects of the programme, but makes a major contribution through provision of industrial training and a colloquium series. There is also interaction with students through leadership courses, recruitment evenings, industry visits and social activities.

The programme has been extraordinarily successful in meeting the needs of industry — it seems likely that a significant part of this success is due to this industry involvement. Most of the practices detailed in this paper are not radical or expensive; many would have application to other disciplines. All aspects of software engineering would benefit from adoption of these practices.

Keywords

Experiential Learning Learning Strategy Information System Workplace Learning Project Base Learning 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Geoffrey N Dick
    • 1
  • Stuart F Jones
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Information SystemsUniversity of New South WalesSydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Andersen ConsultingSydneyAustralia

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