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Database evolution: the DB-MAIN approach

  • J. -L. Hainaut
  • V. Englebert
  • J. Henrard
  • J. -M. Hick
  • D. Roland
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 881)

Abstract

The paper analyses some of the practical problems that arise when the requirements of an information system evolve, and when the database and its application programs are to be modified accordingly. It presents four important strategies to cope with this evolution, namely forward maintenance, backward maintenance, reverse engineering and anticipating design. A common, generic, framework that can support these strategies is described. It is based on a generic data structure model, on a transformational approach to database engineering, and on a design process model. The paper discusses how this framework allows formalizing these evolution strategies, and describes a generic CASE tool that supports database applications maintenance.

Keywords

database evolution database re-engineering reverse engineering transformational approach process modeling CASE tool 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. -L. Hainaut
    • 1
  • V. Englebert
    • 1
  • J. Henrard
    • 1
  • J. -M. Hick
    • 1
  • D. Roland
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut d'InformatiqueUniv. of NamurNamur

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