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FPGA based low cost Generic Reusable Module for the rapid prototyping of subsystems

  • Apostolos Dollas
  • Brent Ward
  • John Daniel Sterling Babcock
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 849)

Abstract

The development of a model for sub-system reuse and the evaluation of currently available rapid prototyping platforms has led to the development of a GEneric Reusable Module (GERM). The GERM is a low-cost, stand-alone, reprogrammable development tool designed for prototyping digital subsystems. The GERM, and associated templates, aid the designer in rapidly prototyping and reusing subsystem designs. The GERM addresses also the introduction of students to FPGA technology in an environment which they can continue to use for more complex designs. Extensions of the GERM include combining multiple GERMs together to prototype larger subsystems and systems. The system was used successfully in computer engineering courses at Duke University.

Keywords

Logic Description Rapid System Prototype Xilinx FPGA Schematic Capture FPGA Technology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Apostolos Dollas
    • 1
  • Brent Ward
    • 1
  • John Daniel Sterling Babcock
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Electrical EngineeringDuke UniversityDurhamUSA

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