A zoomable DBMS for brain structure, function and behavior

  • J. Carlis
  • J. Riedl
  • A. Georgopoulos
  • G. Wilcox
  • R. Elde
  • J. Pardo
  • K. Ugurbil
  • E. Retzel
  • J. Maguire
  • B. Miller
  • M. Claypool
  • T. Brelje
  • C. Honda
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 819)

Abstract

We have begun a long-term project to build a new kind of database and its enhanced, supporting database management system (DBMS) for international neuroscience research. Because brain research occurs world-wide, our database will be distributed, encouraging rapid, open dissemination of results to a broad audience of neuroscientists. It will conjoin information and experimental results from many disciplines. We envision a zoomable database of the brain tissue itself, in large part embedded in three dimensions (3D), through which one can “fly.” Within this coarse structure, the database will also organize fine-structural, functional and behavioral data. As often as possible, the database will express experimental data in its purest, least analyzed form, so that expensive raw data can be analyzed and reanalyzed by researchers worldwide.

We believe that our project will profoundly effect the way in which neuroscience is done, while providing key areas for database research and distributed computing.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    L. Barnett and J. Carlis. Feature information support and the sdts conceptual data model: Clarification and extension. In Proceedings AUTO-CARTO 11, Eleventh International Symposium on Computer Assisted Cartography, 1993.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    P. Bernstein and N. Goodman. An algorithm for concurrency control and recovery in replicated distributed databases. ACM Transactions on Database Systems, 9(4):596–615, December 1984.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    P. Bernstein, V. Hadzilacos, and N. Goodman. Concurrency Control and Recovery in Database Systems. Addison-Wesley, 1987.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    P. Bernstein and Goodman, N.. An algorithm for concurrency control and recovery in replicated distributed databases. ACM Transactions on Database Systems, 9(4):596–615, 1984.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Ken Birman. Replication and availability in the ISIS system. Operating System Review, 19(5):79–86, December 1985.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    A.D. Birrell, R. Levin, R.M. Needham, and M. Schroeder. Grapevine: An exercise in distributed computing. Communications of the ACM, 25:260–274, April 1982.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Michael Carey and Michael Stonebraker. The performance of concurrency control algorithms for database management systems. In Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference on Very Large Data Bases, Singapore, August 1984.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    J. Carlis. Data Modeling. 1994. Book manuscript, in press.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    J. Carlis and S. March. Multi-level model of physical database design problems and solutions. In IEEE COMPDEC Conference, February 1984.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    J. Carlis, S. March, and G Dickson. Physical database design: A dss approach. Information and Management, August 1983.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    S. M. Carlton, C. C. Lamotte, C. N. Honda, D. J. Surmeier, N. Delanerolle, and W. D. Willis. Ultrastructural analysis of axosomatic contacts on functionally identified primate spinothalamic tract neurons. J Comp Neurol, 281(4):555–66, 1989.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Jim Gray. The transaction concept: Virtues and limitations. In Proc of the VLDB Conference, Cannes, France, September 1981.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    J.N. Gray, R.A. Lorie, G.F. Putzolu, and I.L. Traiger. Granularity of locks and degrees of consistency in a shared data base. In G.M. Nijssen, editor, Modeling in Data Base Management Systems. North Holland, Amsterdam, 1976.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    J. Held and J. Carlis. Conceptual data modeling of an expert system. IEEE Expert, Spring 1989.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    P. Kanellakis and C. Papadimitriou. The complexity of distributed concurrency control. SIAM J. Comput., 14(1):52–74, February 1985.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    L. Lamport. Time, clocks, and the ordering of events in a distributed system. Communications of the ACM, 21(7):558–565, July 1978.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    C. Papadimitriou. The Theory of Database Concurrency Control. Computer Science Press, 1986.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    K. Ryan and J. Carlis. Automatic generation of representative query sets. In Proceedings of the 1984 Trends and Applications Conference, N.B.S., May 1984.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    S. Sarawagi and M. Stonebraker. Efficient organization of large multidimensional arrays. In Proceedings of the International Conference on Data Engineering, Houston, TX, February 1994.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    M. Senko. Data Structures and Accessing in Data-Base Systems. IBM Systems, January 1973.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    D. Skeen. Nonblocking commit protocols. In Proceedings of the 1981 ACM-SIGMOD International Conference on Management of Data, pages 133–142, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 1981.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    D. Skeen and M. Stonebraker. A formal model of crash recovery in a distributed system. IEEE Transaction on Software Engineering, SE-9(3):219–227, May 1983.Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Michael Stonebraker. An overview of the sequoia 2000 project. Sequoia 2000 Technical Report 91/5, University of California, Berkeley, CA, December 1991.Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Michael Stonebraker, James Frew, and Jeff Dozier. The sequoia 2000 architecture and implementation strategy. Sequoia 2000 Technical Report 93/23, University of California, Berkeley, CA, April 1993.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Carlis
    • 1
  • J. Riedl
    • 1
  • A. Georgopoulos
    • 1
  • G. Wilcox
    • 1
  • R. Elde
    • 1
  • J. Pardo
    • 1
  • K. Ugurbil
    • 1
  • E. Retzel
    • 1
  • J. Maguire
    • 1
  • B. Miller
    • 1
  • M. Claypool
    • 1
  • T. Brelje
    • 1
  • C. Honda
    • 1
  1. 1.Science Department and Medical SchoolUniversity of Minnesota ComputerUSA

Personalised recommendations