Agent oriented programming: An overview of the framework and summary of recent research

  • Yoav Shoham
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 808)

Abstract

This is a short overview of the agent oriented programming (AOP) framework. AOP can be viewed as an specialization of object-oriented programming. The state of an agent consists of components called beliefs, choices, capabilities, commitments, and possibly others; for this reason the state of an agent is called its mental state. The mental state of agents is captured formally in an extension of standard epistemic logics: beside temporalizing the knowledge and belief operators, AOP introduces operators for commitment, choice and capability. Agents are controlled by agent programs, which include primitives for communicating with other agents. In the spirit of speech-act theory, each communication primitives is of a certain type: informing, requesting, offering, and so on. This paper describes these features in a little more detail, and summarizes recent results and ongoing AOP-related work.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yoav Shoham
    • 1
  1. 1.Computer Science DepartmentStanford UniversityStanford

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