Advertisement

First class messages as first class continuations

  • Ken Wakita
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 742)

Abstract

First class messages, which we call message continuations, provide object-oriented concurrent programming languages with extensibility in modeling and programming communication schemes such as asynchronous communication, multicasting, sophisticated synchronization constraints, inter-object synchronization, concurrency control, resource management, and so on. In spite of its powerful extensibility, the framework is sound in that the framework guarantees that no program can destroy the semantics of the built-in communication primitives. This good property was obtained by categorization of message continuations and careful design of the primitive operations on message continuations.

Key words

Object-oriented concurrent programming first class message first class continuation extensibility communication synchronization 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. [ABV92]
    Mehmet Aksit, Lodewijk Bergmans, and Sinan Vural. An object-oriented langaugedatabase integration model: the composition-filters approach. Technical report, The university of Twente, 1992.Google Scholar
  2. [AM91]
    A. Appel and D. MacQueen. Standard ML of New Jersey. In M. Wirsing, editor, Third International Symposium on Programming Language Implementation and Logic Programming, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, New York, August 1991. Springer-Verlag.Google Scholar
  3. [Ame87]
    P. America. POOL-T: A parallel object-oriented language. In A. Yonezawa and M. Tokoro, editors, Object-Oriented Concurrent Programming, pages 199–220. MIT Press, Cambridge, Mass., 1987.Google Scholar
  4. [AW+ 92]
    [AW+92] M. Aksit, K. Wakita, et al. Abstracting object interactions using composition filters. Project Report of TRESE group, the university of Twente, the Netherlands, 1992.Google Scholar
  5. [BHJL86]
    A. Black, N. Hutchinson, E. Jul, and H. Levy. Object structure in the Emerald system. In Object-Oriented Programming Systems, Languages and Applications, volume 21(11), pages 78–86. SIGPLAN Notices (ACM), November 1986.Google Scholar
  6. [BK91]
    N. S. Barghouti and G. E. Kaiser. Concurrency contorl in advanced database applications. ACM Computing Surveys, 23(3):269–318, September 1991.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. [dJ91]
    Peter de Jong, editor. Conference on Organizational Computing Systems '91. ACM press, 1991. SIGOIS Bulletin vol. 12, number 2 (3).Google Scholar
  8. [EG89]
    C. A. Ellis and S. J. Gibbs. Concurrency control in groupware systems. In Proceedings of International Conference on the Management of Data, SIGMOD RECORD, pages 399–107, Portland, Oregon, June 1989.Google Scholar
  9. [HF87]
    C. T. Haynes and D. P. Friedman. Embedding continuations in procedural objects. ACM Transactions on Programming Languages and Systems, 9(4):582–598, April 1987.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. [IT87]
    Y. Ishikawa and M. Tokoro. Orient84/K: An object-oriented concurrent programming language for knowledge representation. In A. Yonezawa and M. Tokoro, editors, Object-Oriented Concurrent Programming, pages 159–198. MIT Press, Cambridge, Mass., 1987.Google Scholar
  11. [MTH89]
    R. Milner, M. Tofte, and R. Harper. The Definition of Standard ML. MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1989.Google Scholar
  12. [MWY91]
    S. Matsuoka, T. Watanabe, and A. Yonezawa. Hybrid group reflective architecture for object-oriented concurrent reflective programming. In P. America, editor, Proceedings of European Conference on Object-Oriented Programming '91, volume 512 of Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Geneva, Switzerland, July 1991. Springer-Verlag.Google Scholar
  13. [Nie87]
    O. M. Nierstrasz. Active objects in Hybrid. In Object-Oriented Programming Systems, Languages and Applications, volume 22(12), pages 243–253. SIGPLAN Notices (ACM), December 1987.Google Scholar
  14. [RC86]
    J. Rees and W. Clinger. Revised3 report on the algorithmic language Scheme. ACM SIGPLAN Not., 21(12):37–79, December 1986.Google Scholar
  15. [Sto77]
    J. Stoy. Denotational Semantics: The Scott-Strachey Approach to Programming Language Theory. MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1977.Google Scholar
  16. [Wan80]
    M. Wand. Continuation-based multiprocessing. In Conference Record of the 1980 Lisp Conference, pages 19–28, 1980.Google Scholar
  17. [WY90a]
    K. Wakita and A. Yonezawa. Linguistic supports for development of distributed organizational information systems in object-oriented concurrent computation frameworks. In ACM Conference on Organizational Computing Systems, pages 185–198, November 1990.Google Scholar
  18. [WY90b]
    T. Watanabe and A. Yonezawa. An actor-based metalevel architecture for groupwide reflection. In Proceedings of the REX School/Workshop on Foundations of Object-Oriented Languages (REX/FOOL), Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Noordwijkerhout,the Netherlands, May 1990. Springer-Verlag.Google Scholar
  19. [Yon90]
    A. Yonezawa. ABCL:An Object-Oriented Concurrent System. MITPress, Cambridge, Mass., 1990.Google Scholar
  20. [YT86]
    Y. Yokote and M. Tokoro. The design and implementation of ConcurrentSmalltalk. In Object-Oriented Programming Systems, Languages and Applications, volume 21(11), pages 331–340. SIGPLAN Notices (ACM), November 1986.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ken Wakita
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Information ScienceTokyo Institute of TechnologyTokyoJapan

Personalised recommendations