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Knowledge acquisition without analysis

Life Cycle and Methodologies Methodologies
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 723)

Abstract

This paper suggests that a distinction between knowledge acquisition methods should be made. On the one hand there are methods which aim to help the expert and knowledge engineer analyse what knowledge is involved in solving a particular type of problem and how this problem solving is carried out. These methods are concerned with classifying the different types of problem solving and providing tools and methods to help the knowledge engineer identify the appropriate approach and ensure nothing is omitted. A different approach to knowledge acquisition focuses on ensuring incremental addition of validated knowledge as mistakes are discovered (validated knowledge here means only that the earlier performance of the system is not degraded by the addition of new knowledge). The organisation of this knowledge is managed by the system rather than the expert and knowledge engineer. This would seem to correspond to human incremental development of expertise. From this perspective task analysis is a secondary activity related to explanation and justification not acknowledge acquisition. Ripple Down Rules is a limited example of this approach. The paper considers the possibility of extending this approach to make it more generally applicable.

Keywords

Knowledge Base Expert System Knowledge Acquisition Knowledge Engineering Multiple Classification 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Computer Science and EngineeringUniversity of New South WalesKensingtonAustralia
  2. 2.School of ChemistryUniversity of New South WalesKensingtonAustralia

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