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A review of Sisyphus 91 & 92: Models of problem-solving knowledge

Problem Solving Models Comparison of Approaches
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 723)

Abstract

We summarize the papers submitted for the methods-of-problem-solving part of Sisyphus in 1991 and 1992. We describe a three-dimensional framework to situate and compare the different approaches that were used to solve the office assignment problem. We analyze the approaches by highlighting the building blocks they provide to the model creator, their focus (i.e., conceptualisation or implementation), and the support they provide for special activities in the development cycle for knowledge-based systems.

Keywords

Domain Knowledge Knowledge Acquisition Task Model Knowledge Source Development Cycle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.AI Research GroupDECMarlboro

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