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The cognitive structure of space: An analysis of temporal sequences

  • Stephen C. Hirtle
  • Thea Ghiselli-Crippa
  • Michael B. Spring
Temporal Reasoning
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 716)

Abstract

This paper discusses some methods for representing the structure of cognitive space as revealed through temporal sequences. The temporal sequences most commonly arise either through recalls of landmarks in memory experiments or through choice sequences in variants of the traveling salesman problem. Methods discussed include ordered trees, which capture hierarchical relationships, and path graphs, which include the explicit spatial information. The paper concludes with comments on the visualization and presentation of spatial information.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen C. Hirtle
    • 1
  • Thea Ghiselli-Crippa
    • 1
  • Michael B. Spring
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Information ScienceUniversity of PittsburghPittsburgh

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