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Knowledge representation for an intelligent tutoring system based on a multilevel causal model

  • Ramzan A. Khuwaja
  • Martha W. Evens
  • Allen A. Rovick
  • Joel A. Michael
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 608)

Abstract

An explicit representation of knowledge is central for an Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS). In order for a system to acquire the necessary flexibility, its knowledge representation framework should distinguish between several types of knowledge and structure them in layers. Here, we present a method for representing domain knowledge for an ITS, using hierarchical knowledge structures and a multilevel causal model of the domain. The successive levels of this causal model increase in complexity to more closely approximate a complete domain model. The resulting knowledge structures have the flexibility that is needed to invoke a sophisticated instructional session.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ramzan A. Khuwaja
    • 1
  • Martha W. Evens
    • 1
  • Allen A. Rovick
    • 2
  • Joel A. Michael
    • 2
  1. 1.Computer Science DepartmentIllinois Institute of TechnologyChicago
  2. 2.Department of PhysiologyRush Medical CollegeChicago

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