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Knowledge acquisition for explainable, multi-expert, knowledge-based design systems

  • Rose Dieng
  • Alain Giboin
  • Paul-André Tourtier
  • Olivier Corby
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 599)

Abstract

In order to help the knowledge engineer and the expert during knowledge acquisition phase, the ACACIA Group is working on a knowledge acquisition methodology and tool (KATEMES) allowing knowledge acquisition from multiple experts, exploiting the specificities of design problems and preparing the assistance to the end-user and the quality of explanations he will be provided with. This paper describes our research program. After a brief description of our previous knowledge acquisition tool SDKAT, we will present the primitives of KATEMES and the problems we intend to study and the ideas we intend to deepen about the link between knowledge acquisition and explanations, knowledge acquisition from multiple experts and methodological aspects.

Keywords

knowledge acquisition and explanations knowledge acquisition from multiple experts knowledge graphs cognitive agents design applications 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rose Dieng
    • 1
  • Alain Giboin
    • 1
  • Paul-André Tourtier
    • 1
  • Olivier Corby
    • 1
  1. 1.SECOIA ProjectINRIA-CERMICSValbonne CedexFrance

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