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An even-parity/odd-parity formulation for deterministic transport calculations on massively parallel computers (U)

  • J. E. Morel
  • L. A. Olvey
  • G. W. Claborn
  • J. A. Josef
Session III Transport, Diffusion, and Parallel Computing
Part of the Lecture Notes in Physics book series (LNP, volume 395)

Abstract

We have developed a highly parallel deterministic method for performing time-dependent particle (neutron, gamma-ray, or thermal radiation) transport calculations on arbitrarily connected 3-D tetrahedral meshes. The standard discrete-ordinates method, which is used to solve the first-order form of the transport equation, is extremely cumbersome to apply on such meshes and is based upon a mesh sweeping algorithm that is highly sequential in nature. A serial 1-D code for the CRAY-YMP and a parallel 1-D code for the CM-2 (Connection Machine) have been written to test our basic method. Comparisons between these two codes have shown that our new even/odd parity method is highly parallelizable.

Keywords

Tetrahedral Mesh Mesh Cell Acceleration Scheme Vacuum Boundary Connection Machine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. E. Morel
    • 1
  • L. A. Olvey
    • 1
  • G. W. Claborn
    • 1
  • J. A. Josef
    • 1
  1. 1.Los Alamos National LaboratoryUniversity of CaliforniaLos Alamos

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