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Incremental vocabulary extensions in text understanding systems

  • Petra Ludewig
Chapter
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 546)

Abstract

Natural language understanding systems which have to prove good in interesting applications cannot manage without some mechanism for dealing with lexical gaps. In this paper four strategies appropriate for goal-directed vocabulary extensions — ‘contextual’ specification, use of morphological rules, access to external lexica and interactive user input — are outlined, directing the principal attention to the exploitation of machine-readable versions of conventional dictionaries (MRDs). These mechanisms complement each other as they are geared to different types of unknown words and may be used recursively. A temporary lexicon is introduced to cope with the uncertainty and partiality of the so-gained lexical information. The treatment of unknown words presented in this paper contributes to overcoming the bottleneck concerning lexical and, to some degree, conceptual knowledge.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

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  • Petra Ludewig

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