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Modal logics for mobile processes

  • Robin Milner
  • Joachim Parrow
  • David Walker
Invited Lectures
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 527)

Abstract

In process algebras, bisimulation equivalence is typically defined directly in terms of the operational rules of action; it also has an alternative characterisation in terms of a simple modal logic (sometimes called Hennessy-Milner logic. This paper first defines two forms of bisimulation equivalence for the π-calculus, a process algebra which allows dynamic reconfiguration among processes; it then explores a family of possible logics, with different modal operators. It is proven that two of these logics characterise the two bisimulation equivalences. Also, the relative expressive power of all the logics is exhibited as a lattice.

Keywords

Induction Hypothesis Modal Logic Input Action Process Algebra Communicate Sequential Process 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. [1]
    Hennessy, M., Algebraic Theory of Processes, MIT Press, 1988.Google Scholar
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    Hennessy, M. and Milner, R., Algebraic Laws for Non-determinism and Concurrency, Journal of ACM, Vol 32, pp137–161, 1985.Google Scholar
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    Hoare, C.A.R., Communicating Sequential Processes, Prentice Hall, 1985.Google Scholar
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    Milner, R., Communication and Concurrency, Prentice Hall, 1989.Google Scholar
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    Milner, R., Parrow, J. and Walker, D., A Calculus of Mobile Processes, Part I, Reports ECS-LFCS-89-85, Laboratory for Foundations of Computer Science, Computer Science Department, Edinburgh University, 1989. Also to appear in J. Information and Computation.Google Scholar
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    Milner, R., Parrow, J. and Walker, D., A Calculus of Mobile Processes, Part II, Reports ECS-LFCS-89-86, Laboratory for Foundations of Computer Science, Computer Science Department, Edinburgh University, 1989. Also to appear in J. Information and Computation.Google Scholar
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    Park, D.M.R., Concurrency and Automata on Infinite Sequences, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol 104, Springer Verlag, 1980.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robin Milner
    • 1
  • Joachim Parrow
    • 2
  • David Walker
    • 3
  1. 1.University of EdinburghScotland
  2. 2.Swedish Institute of Computer ScienceSweden
  3. 3.University of TechnologySydneyAustralia

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